Retooling the Humanities

Is market-driven research healthy? Responding to the language of “knowledge mobilization” that percolates through Canadian postsecondary education, the literary scholars who contributed these essays address the challenges that an intensified culture of research capitalism brings to the humanities in particular. Stakeholders in Canada's research infrastructure—university students, professors, and administrators; grant policy makers and bureaucrats; and the public who are the ultimate inheritors of such knowledge—are urged to examine a range of perspectives on the increasingly entrepreneurial university environment and its growing corporate culture.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Front Cover 1
Title Page 4
Copyright 5
Contents 6
Abbreviations 8
Acknowledgements 10
Preface | Coleman & Kamboureli 14
Introduction | Coleman & Kamboureli 26
1 Extraordinary Renditions | Findlay 66
2 Taking it Personally and Politically | Palmateer Pennee 84
3 Mining the Valley of Its Making | Dobson 102
4 Taking a Place at the Table | Schagerl 120
5 Employing Equity in Post-secondary Art Institutes | Mathur & Wong 138
6 SSHRC’s Strategic Programs, the Metropolis Project, and Multiculturalism Research | Stone 158
7 “everything wants to hang together” | Danyluk 186
8 Making the Reference Personal | Stephens 210
9 Don’t Mind the Gap | Brown 228
10 Do the Humanities Need a New Humanism? | Brydon 258
Coda | Coleman and Kamboureli 288
Works Cited 294
Contributors 322
Index 328