The Importance of Being Monogamous

Marriage and Nation Building in Western Canada in 1915

Ebook

The Importance of Being Monogamous

Sarah Carter reveals the pioneering efforts of the government, legal, and religious authorities to impose the “one man, one woman”model of marriage upon Mormons and Aboriginal people in Western Canada. This lucidly written, richly researched book revises what we know about marriage and the gendered politics of late 19th century reform, shifts our understanding of Aboriginal history during that time, and brings together the fields of Indigenous and migrant history in new and important ways.

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Cover Page 1
Contents 10
Acknowledgements 12
ONE: Creating, Challenging, Imposing, and Defending the Marriage “Fortress” 18
TWO: Customs Not in Common: THE MONOGAMOUS IDEAL AND DIVERSE MARITAL LANDSCAPE OF WESTERN CANADA 36
THREE: Making Newcomers to Western Canada Monogamous 80
FOUR: “A Striking Contrast…Where Perpetuity of Union and Exclusiveness is Not a Rule, at Least Not a Strict Rule”: PLAINS ABORIGINAL MARRIAGE 120
FIVE: The 1886 “Traffic in Indian Girls” Panic and the Foundation of the Federal Approach to Aboriginal Marriage and Divorce 164
SIX: Creating “Semi-Widows” and “Supernumerary Wives”: PROHIBITING POLYGAMY IN PRAIRIE CANADA'S ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES 210
SEVEN: “Undigested, Conflicting and Inharmonious”: ADMINISTERING FIRST NATIONS MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE 248
EIGHT: Conclusion 296
Appendix 304
Notes 314
Bibliography 360
A 378
Index 378
B 380
C 382
D 384
E 385
F 386
G 386
H 387
I 388
K 389
L 389
J 389
M 390
N 393
O 394
P 394
Q 395
R 395
S 396
T 398
W 399
V 399
U 399
Y 400